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Philosophy

The World as Pathology of Self-Deception

We trade substance, experience and a visceral, lived sense of meaning for a hollow representation of these same things and in finding ourselves dissatisfied and haunted over the transactional deficit of a mechanism that always loses energy and value, we feel quite positively compelled and emotionally motivated to double-down on our losing hand. This is the general process by which abstraction and compression occur in dynamical systems but between our ears and within the hard limits that birth death assert upon our experience, it is – of course – all we have.

We can no more discover meaning in these external superficialities of possession, ownership and the fleeting satisfaction that tribal self-validation invokes in us than we could ever fully explain ourselves or the world through language. We find ourselves inhabiting the interior surface of a semantic architecture that, just and precisely as an introspective representation of itself (through us), simulates the possibility of closure without ever providing it. In this sense, we are just as broken and unprovable as is the language that we discover has always inhabited and exploited us much more than we ever used it.

The world as pathology of self-deception is that cyclical pattern of thought and experience through which we self-define by a distance and difference that only ever generates a vacuum of self that leads us to create yet more dissociative distance and difference to attempt to resolve it. It is an enigma that is not meant to be solved because if one was ever to do so, they would quite simply vanish and this is why it has an intractably paradoxical internal logic, as do we.

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